I like cancelled plans. And empty bookstores. I like rainy days and thunderstorms. And quiet coffee shops. I like messy beds and over-worn pajamas. Most of all, I like the small joys that a simple life brings.

note to self  (via bl-ossomed)


MATT LeBLANC: There’s only five people in the world who know exactly what being on Friends was like, other than me. There’s five of them. David, Matthew, Lisa, Courteney, and Jen. That’s it. Marta and David were close, but when they left the stage, no one knew what they did. We could never leave the stage, metaphorically speaking. Still can’t. Still on that stage. That will follow us around forever.
More important than anything else is the look on people’s faces when you cross paths with them in the street, or in the store, or in the grocery line. You can always tell that you were—maybe still are, maybe always will be—a part of their family. Movies have this thing where it’s an event. You get dressed up, you go to dinner, and you go to the movies. You’re outside of your element. But with television, people are watching you in bed, at their kitchen table eating. You’re in their house.
I did not want it to end.

MATT LeBLANC: There’s only five people in the world who know exactly what being on Friends was like, other than me. There’s five of them. David, Matthew, Lisa, Courteney, and Jen. That’s it. Marta and David were close, but when they left the stage, no one knew what they did. We could never leave the stage, metaphorically speaking. Still can’t. Still on that stage. That will follow us around forever.

More important than anything else is the look on people’s faces when you cross paths with them in the street, or in the store, or in the grocery line. You can always tell that you were—maybe still are, maybe always will be—a part of their family. Movies have this thing where it’s an event. You get dressed up, you go to dinner, and you go to the movies. You’re outside of your element. But with television, people are watching you in bed, at their kitchen table eating. You’re in their house.

I did not want it to end.

'To write down one's impressions of Hamlet as one reads it year after year,' wrote Virginia Woolf, 'would be virtually to record one's own autobiography, for as we know more of life, so Shakespeare comments upon what we know.'

A History of Reading, Alberto Manguel (via williamshakespearethings)

Frost

literarystarbucks:

Robert Frost goes up to the counter and orders a tall pumpkin spice latte. He takes one sip, but he drops it on the floor almost instantly. “Nothing gold can say,” he says sadly, and walks away into the fall evening.

Melville

literarystarbucks:

Melville goes up to the counter and orders a trenta white chocolate mocha. Instead of waiting at the counter, he sits down at a table. The barista brings it over. “Don’t you want to drink this, sir?” she asks. “I would prefer not to,” says Melville, and leaves.

Twain

literarystarbucks:

Mark Twain goes up to the counter and orders the quintessential American coffee, but under a fake name. He leaves it there. No one is allowed to drink it for 100 years after he leaves.

Steinbeck

literarystarbucks:

Steinbeck goes up to the counter and begins to order, but sees that his barista’s name is Adam. Steinbeck laughs and asks if he has any children. Adam just wants to get on with his day, so he says, “Can I take your order, sir?” Steinbeck says, “Thou mayest.”

Calling a show is an art. If someone tells you otherwise, slap them in the face.

Ken Davis, Production Stage Manager of The Lion King (US tour)